Learning Therapy

Learning to read, write and calculate is not child's play for every child – we help with learning therapy!
As state-certified speech therapists with comprehensive, interdisciplinary training as a learning therapist, we have also specialized in the holistic support of children with school and learning problems. Why? Scientific studies have shown that children who have been in speech therapy at preschool age due to a speech development or articulation disorder are significantly more likely to develop an isolated learning disorder at school age, such as a reading and spelling disorder. Our many years of practical experience confirm these results.

Learning is a process that lasts throughout life and plays an important role, especially at the beginning of our lives.
This is where the course is set for independent and autonomous learning. In the case of a learning disability, the exact analysis of the circumstances and causes is therefore of particular relevance in order to create individual and effective support plans, to work specifically on the content and to learn learning in the long term. Unfortunately, the therapy of learning disorders (e.g. LRS) is not a service of the statutory health insurance companies and must be paid privately. However, it may be possible to take advantage of state funding for learning therapy.

Our experienced and dedicated team of highly qualified experts will accompany you and your child professionally in the event of partial performance disorders and school problems. With our learning therapy, we attach particular importance to individual support in which all participants – the child, the parents, the teachers and possibly other therapists – are involved. You and your child benefit from our integrative approach and interdisciplinary cooperation with the doctors and therapists based in the VitalCenter as well as with other specialist disciplines. Our goal is the learning success of your child.

Trust in an individual and qualified learning therapy through expert advice, diagnostics and treatment at:

A dyslexia (or dyslexia) is defined as a developmental disorder of reading and writing. This is a partial performance disorder, since only the read and write performance are affected. In other areas, however, there are no abnormalities in those affected. LRS can occur in isolation or in combination with other partial performance disorders (e.g. arithmetic weakness). Symptoms of LRS include difficulty writing words aloud, remembering letters, letter mixups and omissions, and frequent violations of previously learned spelling rules. Even when reading, it can be difficult to connect sounds, grasp familiar words as a whole, and speed up the reading process. Often words are "guessed" and related texts are not captured appropriately.

The diagnosis of "LRS" is usually made by a specialist in child and adolescent psychiatry or a psychologist. Often, attention performance and the ability to concentrate also play a role. The goals of learning therapy must therefore be individually adapted to the initial situation and needs of those affected and include the areas of attention, concentration, perception, error processing and regular knowledge as well as motivation. In most cases, a longer funding must be assumed (1-3 years). The treatment of LRS is not covered by the statutory health insurance and must be paid privately. However, it may be possible to apply to the offices for reimbursement of the costs pursuant to § 35 a SGB. Please contact us, we will be happy to provide further information.

In the case of dyscalculia, the recording and handling of quantities and numbers as well as arithmetic operations such as addition, subtraction, division and multiplication is so difficult that even after much practice, frequent errors occur even in the simplest arithmetic operations. The symptoms include, for example, problems with the holistic recording of quantities, counting quantities with the help of the counting method or problems with learning basic arithmetic. For example, it can be very difficult to exceed the ten or add without the help of fingers. The arithmetic weakness is a partial performance disorder that can occur either in isolation or in combination with other partial performance disorders.

The diagnosis of "dyscalculia" is usually made by a specialist in child and adolescent psychiatry or a psychologist. Often, attention performance and the ability to concentrate also play a role. The goals of learning therapy include imparting arithmetic knowledge, developing support strategies for dealing with numbers and advising parents or relatives as well as exchanging ideas with teachers. The therapy of dyscalculia is not covered by the statutory health insurance and must be paid privately. However, it may be possible to apply to the offices for reimbursement of the costs pursuant to § 35 a SGB. Please contact us, we will be happy to provide further information.

Foreign language acquisition can be particularly challenging for children with learning disabilities or for children diagnosed with a language development delay at preschool age. Especially children with poor reading and spelling often find it difficult to learn the foreign word forms and pronunciation rules. Through targeted training and the teaching of learning strategies that your child can use independently, we help.

Perceptual weaknesses, e.g. in the visual or auditory area, can make it difficult for a child to concentrate sufficiently or to process visual and auditory stimuli effectively. Easy distraction and high openness to stimuli can prevent it from absorbing and automating new learning content. When writing letters or numbers, reflections may occur. It quickly comes to restlessness, frequent inquiries, possibly the child is even perceived as a "class clown" or "disturber". Perception and concentration weaknesses often have a variety of symptoms and can seriously endanger school success. A thorough diagnosis is absolutely necessary in order to distinguish different disorders from each other and to offer the right learning therapy. We often work together with other specialist disciplines, such as specialists in phoniatrics and paediatric audiology, child and adolescent psychiatry or occupational therapists.

The transition from kindergarten to school is not an easy step for all children. The completely new situation with many other children, sitting in one place for a longer period of time, focusing attention on what the teacher says and much more can be overwhelming at first. If, at the same time, difficulties in learning written language or arithmetic are added, a learning deficit quickly arises – in the worst case, the child even loses the desire to go to school. But even with older schoolchildren, there can always be phases in which it is difficult to keep up, especially if the problem of an attention disorder is added or the child is bored by a very quick comprehension or giftedness. We try to find out with you and, if necessary, with the teacher or other disciplines why your child develops school problems and help you to overcome them.

Often, older students and even adult learners fail not because of the difficulty of the subject matter itself, but because of their ability to structure themselves in such a way that a continuous and sustainable learning process becomes possible. Many questions can play a role: How do I prepare for the upcoming school day or a specific subject? How do I reprepare a subject? How do I clarify questions that arise here? Where and how do I write down my homework? How much time do I need for homework? Am I assessing my performance correctly? Why is it that I misjudge myself? How do I archive school and learning materials such as worksheets, protocols, etc.? When do I start learning for the work at hand? How many repetitions do I need to keep something safe? What type of learner am I? Why are my oral grades in the basement – how often do I actually register for a subject? What is the best way to memorize vocabulary, formulas, where can I find the information I am looking for?

A detailed analysis of previous learning habits forms the basis for building a successful learning environment and learning behavior: Learning can be learned – you just have to know how! Students of the lower secondary levels I and II are supported in my practice by experienced teachers and therapists , who can also engage in the required level of the subject matter, while they give help for self-reflection and self-organization. Learning is easier with an individually developed structure!